Testing

Who can get tested?

Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 or who has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 should consider getting tested. NCDHHS issued updated guidance on who should be tested for COVID-19. The new guidance recommends that clinicians test any patient in whom COVID-19 is suspected.

How can I get tested?

Call your health care provider or local health department to determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19. Many health care providers test patients at their offices, but not all do. 

Find a Testing Site

Some testing sites require an appointment and/or a referral from a health care provider. Locations are subject to change.

Most people who get COVID-19 recover without needing medical care. If you are experiencing mild to moderate symptoms (for example fever and cough), call your health care provider to see if you need medical care. If possible, call ahead before visiting a health care facility. 

If you are experiencing severe, life threating symptoms (for example, severe difficulty breathing, altered thinking, blue lips), seek immediate medical care or call 9-1-1.

If you have been tested for COVID-19, please talk to the provider or laboratory that performed the testing about when and how you will receive your test results. Your test results will not be available from NC 211.

Frequently Asked Questions

How is COVID-19 diagnosed? Should I get tested?

How is COVID-19 diagnosed? Should I get tested?

COVID-19 is diagnosed through a laboratory test. If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, you should call to discuss this with your health care provider and your local health department. 

NCDHHS issued updated guidance on who should be tested for COVID-19. The new guidance recommends that clinicians test any patient in whom COVID-19 is suspected.

I don't have health insurance. What should I do?

I don't have health insurance. What should I do?

Call your nearest Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). If you feel you may have COVID-19, be sure to disclose that when you call to obtain an appointment. FQHCs are community-based health care providers that receive federal funds to provide needed health services in communities across the state.

If you are not able to be seen at an FQHC, call your local health department. Free and charitable clinics may also be able to provide assistance. A list of these resources, including contact information, is provided by the Office of Rural Health. 

If you are having a medical emergency, call 911 or call ahead then go to the emergency room.

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